If Highway to Hell (ACDC) Had Hammond Organ!

If Highway To Hell (ACDC) Had Hammond Organ

MARINE LACOSTE / ORGAN / Nov 18, 2022


I will always remember the time when I joined my first rock band as a teenager. We were playing cover songs of the biggest hits of the 60s through the 90s. 

A lot of these songs had no keyboard parts. I was either not playing on that song or doubling the guitar riffs… 

It’s only years later that I discovered the Hammond organ. Learning this unique instrument made me realize how much it was a very versatile instrument but also how a great addition it was to just about any rock, pop and blues songs. 

In this lesson, I’ll show you how I would add some Hammond organ to a legendary tune like Highway to Hell (ACDC) if I was in a rock band context.

To watch the performance video:

Rock’n’Roll!

Je me souviendrai toujours de l’époque où j’ai rejoint mon premier groupe de rock. On faisait des reprises de chansons super connues des années 60 à 90.

D’ailleurs, beaucoup de ces chansons n’avaient aucune partie de claviers. Je me retrouvais donc à ne pas jouer pour cette chanson ou à simplement doubler une ligne de guitare… 

Ce n’est que plusieurs années plus tard dans mon parcours que j’ai découvert l’orgue Hammond. L’apprentissage de cet instrument unique m’a fait réaliser à quel point il était versatile et qu’il était un bel ajout à pas mal n’importe quelle chanson rock, pop ou blues. 

Dans cette leçon, je te montre comment j’ajouterais de l’orgue Hammond sur une pièce rock légendaire tel que Highway to Hell (ACDC) si j’étais dans un contexte de groupe.

Pour visionner le vidéo de performance:

Rock’n’Roll!

Share this:


Return to Blog

Founder of Online Rock Lessons, Marine is the keyboardist for Uncle Kracker, Corey Hart and Highway Hunters.
With over 20 years of experience in show business, Marine is launching the first Canadian Music School dedicated to rock and blues lovers. 


START LEARNING

More Lessons

GET YOUR FREE ACCESS TO THE CHORDS COURSE

Start learning chords on the piano!


Get the Free Course

5 Tips to Boost Your Progress

5 TIPS TO BOOST YOUR PROGRESS

MARINE LACOSTE / ARTICLE / NOV 4, 2022

Do you feel like you’re not progressing as fast as you think you would?
Today I want to talk to you about 5 tips to help you progress at the piano!

1 => Fix Small Goals

When we start learning piano, very often we see this huge mountain of information to learn. 
This is why it’s important to fix small short term goals to always progress.

You can start with simple things just like:

  • Play the C major scale both hands
  • Naming the notes of the treble key
  • Play 3 chords with their chord inversions
  • Play the first like of your song both hands

Take time to write down these goals in a notebook to keep a follow-up of your progress. In a few months, you’ll be able to see all the progress you’ve made!

2 => Play Regularly

You probably already heard that there’s no secret in music, you have to practice and play to progress.

I always advise my students to start with a regular practice routine of 10-15 minutes for a minimum of 2 to 5 times a week. And slowly increase to practice 30 to 60 minutes 5 to 7 times a week.

Always keep a good balance between having fun and practicing to develop new skills.

Start slow and see what works best for you!

3 => Plan Your Practices

The busy schedule syndrome … I know that. The only way I will do something it’s if it’s booked in my calendar. 

The trick is to pick a moment that works for you, that you know you can sit at the piano and to write it down in your schedule. This way, you will already have set aside that time to practice and you will limit the excuses for not doing it.

4 => Keep a Calm Environment

Your work environment makes all the difference in the quality of your practices. Remember to install your piano in a quiet place, where you can ideally close the door if necessary. Put aside distractions like phones and ringtones to get yourself into a good practice mood.

5 => Pick a Song That You Love

The number one reason why we want to learn the piano is the desire to play the songs that we love. Well the good news is, you don’t have to wait years before playing what you love. In fact, there are so many versions of the same song that you can start right away. Start by making a list of all the songs you dream of playing and do some research to find the right sheet music for your level! 

If you need help, don’t hesitate to reply to this email. I’ll be happy to help you out with your search. 
There you go with my 5 tips, I hope it will inspire you and give you some comfort. 

Don’t forget that no matter what, learning piano needs to stay fun! 

Happy Practicing

As-tu l’impression de ne pas avancer aussi vite que tu le pensais?
Aujourd’hui je veux te parler de 5 astuces qui m’ont beaucoup aidé à progresser rapidement au piano. 

1 => Se fixer des petits buts

Quand on commence à apprendre le piano, on a très souvent tendance à voir une immense montagne d’informations à apprendre. C’est pour cette raison que c’est important de se fixer des buts à court terme pour toujours progresser.

Tu peux commencer avec des buts simples comme : 

  • Jouer la gamme de do majeur à 2 mains
  • Être capable de nommer les notes de la clé de sol 
  • Enchaîner 3 accords simples avec leur renversement
  • Jouer la première ligne d’une pièce à 2 mains

Prends le temps d’inscrire ces buts dans un cahier de note pour garder un suivi de ton avancement. Dans quelques mois, tu vas pouvoir analyser tous les progrès que tu auras fait!

2 => Jouer régulièrement

Tu as sûrement déjà entendu qu’il n’y a pas de secret en musique et qu’il faut pratiquer, jouer pour avancer…

Je conseille toujours à mes élèves de commencer par une pratique régulière de 10-15 minutes, pour un minimum de 2 à 5 fois par semaine. Et tranquillement augmenter pour pratiquer de 30 à 60 minutes de 5 à 7 fois par semaine. 

Toujours garder un bon équilibre entre le plaisir de jouer et la répétition pour développer de nouvelles compétences. 

Commence tranquillement et vois ce qui te convient le mieux!

3 => Planifier ses pratiques

Le syndrome de l’horaire chargé… je connais. La seule façon pour que j’accomplisse quelque chose, c’est que ce soit bloqué dans mon horaire.

Le truc c’est de choisir un moment qui te convient, que tu sais que tu peux t’installer au piano et de l’écrire dans ton horaire. De cette façon tu auras déjà réservé ce temps pour pratiquer et tu limiteras les excuses pour ne pas le faire.

4 => Garder un environnement calme

Ton environnement de travail fait toute la différence dans la qualité de tes pratiques. Pense à installer ton piano dans un endroit calme, où tu peux idéalement fermer la porte au besoin. Mets de côté les distractions comme les téléphones et les sonneries pour te mettre dans une bonne ambiance de pratique. 

5 => Choisis une chanson que tu aimes

La raison no1 qui nous motive à apprendre le piano c’est le désir de jouer les chansons qu’on aime. Et bien bonne nouvelle, tu n’as pas besoin d’attendre des années avant de jouer ce qui te fait tripper! En fait, il existe tellement de versions d’une même chanson que tu peux commencer dès maintenant. Fais une liste des chansons que tu rêves le plus de jouer et fais quelques recherches pour trouver des partitions adaptées à ton niveau! 

Si tu as besoin d’aide, hésite pas à répondre à ce courriel et à m’écrire, ça va me faire plaisir de te donner un coup de main dans ta recherche. 

Voilà pour mes 5 astuces j’espère que ça te donne de l’inspiration et du réconfort! 

N’oublie pas que malgré tout ça, apprendre le piano doit rester le fun! 

Bonne pratique!

Share this:


Return to Blog


Founder of Online Rock Lessons, Marine is the keyboardist for Uncle Kracker, Corey Hart and Highway Hunters.
With over 20 years of experience in show business, Marine is launching the first Canadian Music School dedicated to rock and blues lovers. 


START LEARNING

More Lessons

GET YOUR FREE ACCESS TO THE CHORDS COURSE

Start learning chords on the piano!


Get the Free Course

3 Amazing Left Hand Grooves for Pianists

3 Awesome Left Hand Grooves for Pianists

MARINE LACOSTE / CHORDING / OCT 28, 2022


In this lesson, we will learn how to play three super useful left hand grooves to play at the piano.

The grooves are in the key of D minor, which has one flat note (Bb) and will be based on the chord progression i-VI-III-VII. In the key of D minor, the chords of this progression are Dm, Bb, F and C.

Groove #1:

The first groove is fairly simple. It is a mix of half notes, quarter notes and eighth notes.

Since the goal of today’s exercise is to practice grooves played by the left hand, the right hand only plays simple chords in whole notes to create a harmonic support.

The left hand follows a specific formula throughout the whole chord progression. For this groove, we need the notes of the first and fifth degree of our chords. Let’s find the notes of these degrees for the D minor chord. The note of the first degree of the D minor scale is D and the note of the fifth degree of the D minor scale is A. Let’s find the notes of the degrees of the F chord. Its first degree is F and its fifth degree is C.

The rhythm of this groove is as follows : quarter note, eighth note, eighth note, half note. In our progression, we spend two beats on each chord. So, we play the quarter note and the two eighth notes with the notes of the first and fifth degree of the D minor chord (D and A). Then, we move on to the half note played with the note of the first degree of the Bb chord. We repeat this pattern with the two remaining chords of our progression, F and C. The quarter note and the two eighth notes are played with the notes of the first and fifth degree of the F chord (F and C). Then we move on to the half note played by the first degree of the C chord (C). 

Here is our groove #1 written down:

Groove #2:

The second groove is used very often in different genres. It is emulating what the bassist often plays in a group. The rhythm of this groove is as follows: dotted quarter note, eighth note, half note. 

In this groove, we stay all four beats on each chord of the progression and we only use the note of the first degree of each chord. 

The right hand keeps playing chords in whole notes for harmonic support.

The left hand plays the rhythm. On the D minor chord, we play the dotted quarter note, the eight note and the half note with a D. Then, on the Bb chord, we play the dotted quarter note, the eight note and the half note with a Bb. For the F chord, we play the dotted quarter note, the eight note and the half note with an F and finally for the C chord, we play the same rhythm but with a C. 

Dotted quarter notes may be new to you. If so, it is very important to internalize this new rhythm by counting out loud “1 – and – two – and – three – and – four – and” while playing the groove. You can even start by clapping the rhythm with your hands while counting out loud “1 – and – two – and – three – and – four – and”. The dotted quarter note falls on the “1”, the quarter note falls on the “and” of the 2 and the half note falls on the “3”.

Here is our groove #2 written down: 

Groove #3:

The third groove is an arpeggiated accompaniment. This type of groove sounds particularly great on the piano. The rhythm of this groove is all quarter notes.

The right hand is still playing chords in whole notes to ensure harmonic support

The left hand follows a specific formula throughout the whole progression. We use the degrees I-V-I-V-III-V-I-V (make sure to look at the sheet music of this groove to play it correctly since the degrees can be played on different octaves) which are based on the scale of every chord of the progression. The notes of the I-V-I-V-III-V-I-V pattern in D minor are D-A-D-A-F-A-D-A. The notes of the pattern of the Bb chord are Bb-F-Bb-F-D-F-Bb-F. The notes of the pattern of the F chord are F-C-F-C-A-C-F-C. Finally, the notes of the pattern of the C chord are C-G-C-G-E-G-C-G.

Here is our groove #3 written down: 

You now know three new ways to play accompaniments with your left hand. Make sure to transpose them in all keys and try different progressions to really master your grooves!

Text Transcription by Andreane Boucher

Dans cette leçon, nous allons apprendre à jouer trois grooves super utiles à la main gauche.

Les grooves de cette capsule sont en mineur. Cette tonalité ne contient qu’un seul bémol (sib). De plus, ceux-ci sont basés sur la progression d’accords i-VI-III-VII. Dans la tonalité de mineur, cette progression est composée des accords suivants : Dm (mineur), Bb (sib), F (fa) ainsi que C (do).

Groove #1:

Le premier groove est un accompagnement assez simple qui est un mélange rythmique de croches, de noires et de blanches.

Puisque le but de l’exercice d’aujourd’hui est de travailler l’accompagnement à la main gauche, la main droite vient simplement plaquer les accords en ronde pour offrir un support harmonique. 

La main gauche, elle, suit une formule spécifique tout au long de la progression. Nous utilisons les premiers et cinquièmes degrés de nos accords. Commençons avec l’accord de mineur, son premier degré est et son cinquième degré est la. Faisons le même chemin pour l’accord de Fa, son premier degré est fa et son cinquième degré est do

La rythmique de ce groove est la suivante : noire, deux croches, blanche. Dans notre progression, nous restons deux temps sur l’accord de mineur, donc la noire et les deux croches sont jouées avec les notes des degrés I et V de celui-ci (et la). Puis, nous restons deux temps sur l’accord de Sib donc, la blanche sera jouée par le degré I de Sib (sib). Dans la prochaine mesure, nous répétons ce pattern avec l’accord de Fa et de Do. Nous restons deux temps sur l’accord de Fa, donc la noire et les deux croches sont jouées avec les notes des degrés I et V de celui-ci (fa et do). Puis, nous restons deux temps sur l’accord de Do, donc la blanche est jouée par le degré I de Do (do).

Voici le groove #1 écrit : 

Groove #2:

Le deuxième groove est un accompagnement très souvent utilisé qui imite la rythmique qu’un bassiste joue souvent dans un contexte de groupe. Celle-ci est la fameuse noire pointée, croche, blanche. 

Dans cet exercice, nous restons quatre temps sur chaque accord et nous utilisons seulement le degré I de chaque accord. 

La main droite continue de jouer son rôle de support harmonique en jouant les accords en rondes. 

À la main gauche, lors de l’accord de mineur, nous jouons noire pointée, croche blanche sur des ré. Puis, nous allons à notre accord de Sib, tout en jouant noire pointée, croche, blanche, mais cette fois sur des sib. Nous poursuivons à l’accord de Fa, nous faisons toujours la même rythmique, mais sur des fa et finalement, nous allons à l’accord de Do tout en faisant la même rythmique, mais sur des do

Si le concept des noires pointées est nouveau, il est important de prendre le temps de bien l’intérioriser en comptant à voix haute « 1 – et – 2 – et – 3 – et – 4 – et » tout en jouant le groove. Il est également efficace de taper des mains la rythmique en comptant à voix haute avant d’essayer de le jouer au piano. La noire pointée vaut un temps et demi, donc elle est jouée sur le « 1 » et la croche qui suit est jouée sur le « et du 2 », puis la blanche est jouée sur le « 3 ».

Voici le groove #2 écrit :

Groove #3:

Le troisième groove est un accompagnement arpégé. Celui-ci est un style très pianistique. La rythmique de ce pattern n’est composée que de croches.

Encore une fois, la main droite continue d’assurer son rôle de support harmonique en jouant les accords en rondes. 

À la main gauche, nous utilisons une formule que nous allons transposer sur chacun des accords de notre progression. Dans cette formule, nous utilisons les degrés I-V-I-V-III-V-I-V (fiez-vous à la partition ci-dessous pour la hauteur des degrés puisque le pattern s’étend sur plus d’un octave, donc le I peut se trouver à des hauteurs différentes) de la gamme de chaque accord. Sur l’accord de , le pattern I-V-I-V-III-V-I-V est le suivant : ré-la-ré-la-fa-la-ré-la. Sur l’accord de Sib, les notes du pattern sont sib-fa-sib-fa-ré-fa-sib-fa. Sur l’accord de Fa, les notes du pattern sont fa-do-fa-do-la-do-fa-do. Puis, sur l’accord de Do, les notes du pattern sont do-sol-do-sol-mi-sol-do-sol. 

Voici le groove #3 écrit :

Maintenant que vous connaissez trois nouveaux grooves de main gauche, n’oubliez pas de vous amuser à les transposer afin de pouvoir les appliquer à toutes les progressions et tonalités. Bonne pratique!

Transcription par Andréane Boucher

Share this:


Return to Blog

Founder of Online Rock Lessons, Marine is the keyboardist for Uncle Kracker, Corey Hart and Highway Hunters.
With over 20 years of experience in show business, Marine is launching the first Canadian Music School dedicated to rock and blues lovers. 


START LEARNING

More Lessons

GET YOUR FREE ACCESS TO THE CHORDS COURSE

Start learning chords on the piano!


Get the Free Course

4 Amazing Minor Chord Voicings

4 Amazing Minor Chord Voicings

MARINE LACOSTE / CHORDING / OCT 7, 2022

 


In this lesson we will discover 4 voicings to spice up your regular minor chord.

The Minor Chord

The minor chord is based on the degrees 1, 3 and 5 of a minor scale. For this exercise, we will use the A minor chord. The notes of this chord are A, C and E. It is also important to know the inversions of your chord. In this case, the order of the notes of the root position is A, C and E, the order of the notes of the first inversion is C, E and A and finally, the order of the notes of the second inversion is E, A and C.

If the concept of minor chords is new to you, make sure to watch the tutorial explaining

Russell Ferrante’s Triad on Triad Approach:

Russell Ferrante, pianist and keyboardist, found a different way to explain complex chords. His concept consists of playing a triad over a different triad. For the A minor 7 chord, the A minor chord is played with the left hand and the C major chord is played with the right hand. The A minor and C major chords have two notes in common, C and E, and the G in the C major chord is what creates the sound of the minor 7. You can play with different inversions as well as choose if you want to duplicate certain notes (ex. the C note is found in the A minor chord and the C major chord) or play every note once. 

Alternative #2: Minor 9

The second alternative to the regular minor chord we are learning is the A minor 9. This chord is composed of the degrees 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9. The notes of the A minor 9 chord are A, C, E, G and B. Even though the seventh is not mentioned in the name of the chord, it is still implied. 

Since this chord is made up of 5 notes, we have to use both of our hands to properly voice it. There are different ways to voice this chord, you can play the degrees 1 and 5 with the left hand and the degrees 7, 9, 3 and 5 with your right hand. The order of the notes of the A minor 9 chord in this voicing is A, E (left hand), G, B C and E (right hand). 

Triad on Triad Concept

The equivalent of playing a minor 9 chord is to play a C major 7 chord over an A minor chord. The left hand plays an A (the first degree of the A minor scale) and the right hand plays the C major 7 chord which is composed of the notes C, E, G and B (the degrees 3, 5, 7 and 9 of the A minor scale).

Alternative #3: Minor 11

The third alternative to a regular minor 7 chord is the minor 11 chord which consist of the degrees 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11. The seventh and ninth degrees are not mentioned in the name of this chord but are implied. The notes of the A minor 11 chord are A, C, E, G, B and D. 

Since this chord is made up of 6 notes, we have to use both of our hands to properly voice it. There are different ways to voice this chord, you can play the degrees 1 and 5 with your left hand and the degrees 3, 11, 7 and 9 with your right hand. The order of the notes of the A minor 11 chord are A, E (left hand), C, D, G and B (right hand).

Triad on Triad Concept

The minor 11 chord is the equivalent of playing a G major chord over an A minor chord. The left hand plays A, C, E (the degrees 1, 3 and 5 of the A minor scale) and the right hand plays G, B and D (the degrees 7, 9 and 11 of the A minor scale).

Alternative #4: Minor 9(11)

The fourth alternative to the regular minor chord is the minor  11. For this alternative we will play an open voicing.

What Are Open Voicings?

An open voicing is a voicing that has no clusters. It means that there are no notes that are very close to one another. For example, if you want to play C, D and G, the C and D are too close, so you have to change the order of the notes to C, G and D. The D will be an octave higher.

There are different ways to voice this chord. To play an open voicing, you can play the degrees 1 and 5 with your left hand and the degrees 3, 7 and 11 with your right hand. The order of the notes of the A minor 11 in this open voicing are A, E (left hand), C, G and D (right hand).

You now know 4 alternatives to playing a regular minor chord. You can practice these in all keys, chromatically, in all inversions and even play around with a melody with your right hand!

Text Transcription by Andreane Boucher

Dans cette leçon, nous allons découvrir 4 alternatives à l’accord mineur régulier.

L’accord mineur

Un accord mineur est basé sur les degrés 1, 3 et 5 d’une gamme mineure. Pour l’exercice d’aujourd’hui, nous allons utiliser l’accord de La mineur. Les notes de cet accord sont la, do et mi. Il est important de connaître les inversions des accords. Pour l’accord de La mineur, l’ordre des notes à la position fondamentale est la, do et mi. L’ordre des notes du premier renversement est do, mi et la. Puis, l’ordre des notes du deuxième renversement est mi, la et do.

Si le concept d’accords mineurs est nouveau pour toi, clique ici pour 

L’approche « Triade sur triade » de Russell Ferrante

Russell Ferrante, pianiste et claviériste, explique les accords plus complexes d’une façon différente. Son approche consiste à voir les accords comme étant deux triades superposées. Par exemple, l’accord de La mineur 7 serait un mélange de l’accord de La mineur qui est joué à la main gauche et de l’accord de Do majeur qui est joué à la main droite. Les accords de La mineur et de Do majeur ont deux notes en commun, le do et le mi. La présence du sol dans l’accord de Do majeur ajoute la couleur mineur 7, puisque le sol est le degré VII de la gamme de La mineur. 

Il est possible de personnaliser ce voicing en s’amusant avec différentes inversions et en choisissant quelles notes dupliquer ou non. Par exemple, le do se retrouve dans l’accord de La mineur ainsi que dans l’accord de Do majeur, c’est à nous de choisir si nous voulons le dupliquer ou le jouer juste avec une des deux mains.

Alternative #2 : Mineur 9

La seconde alternative à un accord mineur régulier est l’accord mineur 9. Cet accord est composé des degrés 1, 3, 5, 7 et 9. Les notes de l’accord de La mineur 9 sont la, do, mi, sol et si. Bien que dans le nom « mineur 9 », la septième ne soit pas mentionnée, elle est tout de même sous-entendue. 

Puisque cet accord est composé de 5 notes, nous pouvons utiliser nos deux mains pour jouer celui-ci. L’accord mineur 9 peut être joué de la façon suivante : les degrés 1 et 5 avec la main gauche et les degrés 7, 9, 3 et 5 avec la main droite. Pour l’accord de La mineur 9, l’ordre des notes est la, mi (main droite), sol, si, do et mi (main droite).

Concept de triade sur triade

Un accord mineur 9 est l’équivalent de jouer un accord de Do majeur 7 en même temps qu’un accord de La mineur. La main gauche joue un la (le premier degré de la gamme mineur de La) et la main droite joue l’accord de Do majeur 7, donc do, mi, sol et si (les degrés 3, 5, 7 et 9 de la gamme de La mieur).

Alternative #3 : Mineur 11

La troisième alternative à l’accord mineur régulier est l’accord mineur 11. Celle-ci est composée des degrés 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 et 11 de la gamme mineure. La septième ainsi que la neuvième ne sont pas incluses dans le nom de l’accord mais elles sont sous-entendues. Les notes de l’accord de La mineur 11 sont la, do, mi, sol, si et ré.

Puisque cet accord comporte six notes, nous devons utiliser nos deux mains pour le jouer. L’accord mineur 11 peut être joué de la façon suivante : les degrés 1 et 5 à la main gauche ainsi que les degrés 3, 11, 7 et 9 à la main droite. L’ordre des notes de l’accord de La mineur 11 en utilisant ce voicing sera la et mi à la main gauche et do, ré, sol et si à la main droite.

Concept de triade sur triade

Un accord de La mineur 11 est l’équivalent de jouer un accord de Sol majeur en même temps qu’un accord de La mineur. La main gauche joue la, do et mi (les degrés 1, 3 et 5 de la gamme de La mineur) et la main droite joue sol, si et (les degrés 7, 9 et 11 de la gamme de La mineur).

Alternative #4 : Mineur 9(11)

La quatrième alternative à l’accord mineur régulier est l’accord mineur 11. Pour cet accord, nous allons le jouer en « open voicing ».

Qu’est-ce qu’un « open voicing »?

Un open voicing est une succession de notes qui ne sont pas collées. Par exemple, si nous voulons jouer les notes do, ré et sol, sans avoir de notes trop rapprochées (do et ré), nous devons changer l’ordre des notes pour celui-ci : do, sol et , le ré sera donc une octave plus haut.

L’accord mineur 9 (11) en open voicing peut être joué de la façon suivante : les degrés 1 et 5 à la main gauche et les degrés 3, 7 et 9 à la main droite. L’ordre des notes de l’accord de La mineur 9 (11) joué de cette façon sera la et mi à la main droite ainsi que do, sol et à la main droite.

Ces quatre alternatives sont à pratiquer dans toutes les tonalités ainsi que dans toutes les inversions. Vous pouvez également vous amuser à jouer une mélodie à la main droite et les accords à la main gauche. Bonne pratique!

Transcription par Andréane Boucher

Share this:


Return to Blog

Founder of Online Rock Lessons, Marine is the keyboardist for Uncle Kracker, Corey Hart and Highway Hunters.
With over 20 years of experience in show business, Marine is launching the first Canadian Music School dedicated to rock and blues lovers. 


START LEARNING

More Lessons

GET YOUR FREE ACCESS TO THE CHORDS COURSE

Start learning chords on the piano!


Get the Free Course

The Best Ways to Practice Chords at the Piano

THE BEST WAYS TO PRACTICE CHORDS ON THE PIANO

MARINE LACOSTE / CHORDING / JULY 27, 2022

Always wondered what are the best ways to practice chords at the piano? In this lesson I will be teaching you 4 different ways to practice your chords.

Way #1: Chord Inversions

The first way to efficiently practice your chords is by playing them in all inversions.

What Are Chord Inversions?

Chord inversions occur when you change a chord’s note order. Triads can be played in three different ways since they contain 3 notes. The root position, the first inversion and the second inversion are the three different options. 

Let’s use the C major chord to further explain this concept. In the root position, the order of the notes are C, E and G. In the first inversion, the order of the notes are E, G and C. In the second inversion, the order of the notes are G, C and E.

Chord Inversion Exercise

A great way to practice these is to play your chords in the root position, then in the first inversion, then in the second inversion and then back again to the root position. You can do this exercise on two octaves or even go all the way from the lower register to the higher register. Make sure you practice this exercise going up and down. You can start one hand at a time and when you are ready, you can play both hands at the same time. 

Let’s try this exercise with the F chord. The order of the notes of the root position is F, A and C. The order of the notes of the first inversion is A, C and F. The order of the second inversion is C, F and A. As mentioned earlier, you can practice these on two octaves or on the whole piano register. 

This exercise is great to memorize and understand the notes of a new chord quickly.

Way #2: Broken Chords

The second way to practice your triads is by playing broken chords.

What Are Broken Chords?

Playing a broken chord is playing the regular notes of the chord, but one after the other, instead of all of them at the same time. 

Let’s use the C major chord. Instead of playing C, E and G at the same time, you simply play these notes one at a time.

Broken Chord Exercise

Let’s try this exercise with the C major chord. You start by playing the notes of the root position, C, E and G, one note at a time. Then still one note at a time, you play the notes of the first inversion E, G and C. Then you do the same for the second chord inversion. This exercise can be executed on two octaves or even on the whole piano register. Make sure to practice this exercise going up and down. You can start one hand at a time and then both hands together.

With the C major chord, the order of the notes will be C, E, G (which is the root position), E, G, C (which is the first inversion), G, C, E (which is the second inversion), etc. 

Way #3: Chord Progressions

The third way to practice your chords is to play them using chord progressions.

What Are Chord Progressions?

A chord progression is a series of chords that sounds good together. It is built using the different degrees of a scale. 

For example, in the C major scale, the chord associated with the first degree is C, the second is Dm, the third is Em, the fourth is F, the fifth is G, the sixth is Am and the seventh is Bm flat 5.

If you need further explanation on chord progressions, there is a whole

You can practice this progression in many different ways. You can start by playing the chords with both hands in the root position. Then, you can play chords with your right hand still in the root position and play the bass (the root note) with your left hand like we often do when playing songs. Once you have mastered these two ways, you can start playing your chords using the inversions we practiced in the first exercise. Using the chord inversions ensures the usage of the best voicings possible. After having mastered this progression you can always choose a new progression.

The chord progression exercise with inversions is great because it is a fun sounding exercise and it forces you to really think about the notes of each chord.

Way #4: Transposition

The last way to practice your chords is to transpose all three exercises above in all keys. This means practicing your chord inversions, your broken chords and your chord progressions in all keys.

Make sure you practice these exercises with a metronome to keep track of your progress and to have fun!

Text Transcription by Andreane Boucher

Tu t’es toujours demandé quelles étaient les meilleures façons de pratiquer les accords au piano? Voici 4 idées pour pratiquer les accords en t’amusant.

Méthode #1 : Les renversements

La première façon de pratiquer les accords est de les jouer dans tous leurs renversements.

Qu’est-ce que les renversements?

Un renversement d’accord est la modification de l’ordre des notes d’un accord. Une triade peut être jouée de trois façons différentes puisqu’elle est composée de trois notes. Les trois possibilités sont la position fondamentale, le premier renversement et le deuxième renversement.

Prenons l’accord de do majeur pour expliquer le concept des renversements. À la position fondamentale, l’ordre des notes de l’accord de do majeur est do, mi et sol. Au premier renversement, l’ordre des notes de l’accord de do majeur est mi, sol et do. Puis, au deuxième renversement, l’ordre des notes est sol, do et mi.

Exercice de renversements d’accord

L’exercice pour pratiquer ses accords en renversement consiste à jouer un accord dans sa position fondamentale, ensuite dans son premier renversement, dans son deuxième renversement puis de retour à sa position fondamentale. Cet exercice peut être exécuté sur deux octaves ou encore sur tout le registre du piano. Cet exercice est à pratiquer en montant et descendant. Pour commencer, l’exercice peut être joué une main à la fois, puis les deux mains ensemble.

Essayons avec l’accord de fa majeur. L’ordre des notes de la position fondamentale est fa, la et do. L’ordre des notes du premier renversement est la, do et fa.

Puis, l’ordre des notes du deuxième renversement est do, fa et la

Cet exercice est bénéfique à la mémorisation et la compréhension des notes d’un accord.

Méthode #2 : Accords brisés

La deuxième façon de pratiquer les accords est en intégrant les accords brisés.

Qu’est-ce qu’un accord brisé?

Le concept des accords brisés est simplement de jouer les notes d’un accord l’une après l’autre à la place de toutes en même temps.

Prenons l’accord de do majeur. À la place de jouer do, mi et sol tous en même temps, il faut jouer do, mi puis sol un à la suite de l’autre.

Exercice d’accords brisés

Jouer les accords brisés dans tous les renversements est une méthode très efficace.

Reprenons l’accord de do majeur. La première étape est de jouer une note à la fois dans l’ordre de la position fondamentale, donc do, mi et sol. Puis, toujours une note à la fois, il faut jouer les notes dans l’ordre du premier renversement, donc mi, sol et do. Nous faisons le même processus avec l’ordre des notes du deuxième renversement, donc sol, do et mi. Tout comme le premier exercice, celui-ci est à pratiquer en montant et en descendant, il peut être exécuté sur deux octaves ou sur tout le registre du piano et peut être joué une main à la fois puis les deux mains ensemble.

Essayons l’exercice avec l’accord de do majeur. L’ordre des notes sera do, mi, sol (position fondamentale), mi, sol, do (le premier renversement), sol, do, mi (deuxième renversement), etc.

Méthode #3 : Progressions d’accords

La troisième façon de pratiquer les triades est en les jouant dans le contexte d’une progression d’accords.

Qu’est-ce qu’une progression d’accords?

Une progression d’accords est simplement une série d’accords qui sonne bien. Celles-ci sont construites à partir des degrés diatoniques d’une gamme.

Par exemple, dans la gamme de do majeur, la triade associée au premier degré est do majeur, celle du deuxième degré est mineur, celle du troisième degré est mi mineur, celle du quatrième degré est fa majeur, celle du cinquième degré est sol majeur, celle du sixième degré est la mineur puis celle du septième degré est Si mineur bémol 5.

Si tu veux plus d’informations sur les progressions d’accords,

La progression peut être jouée de différentes façons. D’abord, les deux mains peuvent jouer les accords dans la position fondamentale. Lorsque cette façon est maîtrisée, la main droite peut continuer de jouer les accords à l’état fondamental, mais la main gauche joue les toniques (dans l’accord de do majeur, la tonique est do, dans l’accord de fa majeur la tonique est fa, etc.), comme nous le faisons souvent lorsqu’on joue une vraie chanson. 

Lorsque cette deuxième façon est également maîtrisée, nous pouvons intégrer à la main droite les renversements d’accords dont nous avons parlé dans le premier exercice et continuer de jouer les toniques à la main gauche. Les renversements d’accords permettent de choisir les positions les plus efficaces pour la progression. Cet exercice peut également être joué sur la progression de votre choix.

L’exercice de progression d’accords avec renversements est un moyen motivant puisqu’il sonne comme une pièce et est aussi bénéfique à la mémorisation des notes de chaque accord puisqu’il fait réfléchir aux notes les plus près et aux notes communes d’un accord à l’autre.

Méthode #4 : Transposition

La dernière façon de pratiquer les accords est de transposer les trois exercices précédents, soit les renversements d’accords, les accords brisés ainsi que les progressions d’accords dans toutes les tonalités.

Mon dernier conseil est de pratiquer ces exercices avec un métronome pour garder un œil sur son progrès et bien évidemment d’avoir du plaisir en pratiquant!

Transcription par Andréane Boucher

Share this:


Return to Blog

Founder of Online Rock Lessons, Marine is the keyboardist for Uncle Kracker, Corey Hart and Highway Hunters.
With over 20 years of experience in show business, Marine is launching the first Canadian Music School dedicated to rock and blues lovers. 


START LEARNING

More Lessons

GET YOUR FREE ACCESS TO THE CHORDS COURSE

Start learning chords on the piano!


Get the Free Course

3 Beautiful Minor Chord Progressions

3 BEAUTIFUL MINOR CHORD PROGRESSIONS

MARINE LACOSTE / CHORDING / JUN 3, 2022

 

In this lesson, we will be discovering 3 minor chord progressions to compose or practice chords with. 
To build our 3 different minor chord progressions, we will use the degrees of the natural minor scale. Let’s use the A natural minor scale, which is C major’s relative minor scale. The relative minor of a major scale is its sixth degree. A is C major’s sixth degree. Just like the C major scale, the A natural minor scale has no sharp or flat in the key signature.

Diatonic Chords

Now that we know the notes of the A natural minor scale, it is time to build the triads that come from the different degrees of the scale. These triads can only contain notes that are in the A natural minor scale.
The Roman numerals of the natural minor scale are i, iib5, III, iv, v, VI, VII. 

 This means that the chord based on the first degree of the scale is minor. The chord based on the second degree is minor flat 5. The chord based on the third degree is major. The chords based on the fourth and fifth degrees are minor and the chords based on the sixth and seventh degrees are major.

Chord Progression #1: i-III-VI-VII

The first minor chord progression that we are learning is the “i-III-VI-VII”. In the A natural minor key, the chords of this progression are Am-C-F-G. 

It is important to practice this progression in all inversions. By finding the closest voicing to go from one chord to another, inversions lead to a smoother playing.

Transposition

When working with Roman numerals as we do with our “i-III-VI-VII” movement, transposing our progressions in all keys is very beneficial for mastering major and minor chords.

Let’s transpose our “i-III-VI-VII” progression in the D minor key. The D natural minor key has a Bb at the key signature. 

The chord associated with the first degree of the scale is Dm. The chord associated with the third degree is F. The chord associated with the sixth degree is Bb. Finally, the chord associated with the seventh degree is C. Therefore, in the key of D minor, the “i-III-VI-VII” progression is Dm-F-Bb-C.

Chord Progression #2: i-VII-VI

The second minor chord progression we are learning is the “i-VII-VI”. In the A natural minor scale, the chords of this progression are Am-G-F. 
You should also practice this progression in all inversions and all keys.

Chord Progressions #3: i-VI-V-VII

The third chord progression that we are learning is the “i-VI-V-VII”. In the A natural minor key, the chords of this progression are Am-F-Em-G.

You can now use these three minor chord progressions to compose or to practice your chords. As mentioned earlier, the most beneficial way to practice these is by exploring the inversions and by transposing in all keys. Transposing chord progressions is a fun and concrete way to practice major and minor chords.

Text Transcription by Andreane Boucher

Dans cette leçon, nous allons découvrir 3 progressions d’accords mineurs pouvant être utilisées pour composer ou tout simplement pour pratiquer les accords.

Afin de construire nos progressions, nous allons nous baser sur les degrés de la gamme mineure. Prenons la gamme mineure naturelle de La. Celle-ci est la relative mineure de la gamme de Do majeur puisqu’elle se trouve au 6e degré de la gamme de Do majeur. Elle a la même armature que la tonalité de Do majeur, donc aucune altération. 

Accords diatoniques

Maintenant que nous avons établi les notes de la gamme de La mineur naturel, nous pouvons bâtir des triades à partir de chacun des degrés de celle-ci. Ces triades ne peuvent que contenir les notes qui se trouvent dans la gamme de La mineur naturel. Les chiffres romains pour les gammes mineures naturelles sont i, iib5, III, iv, v, VI et VII. 

Cela signifie que l’accord du premier degré est majeur, celui du deuxième degré est mineur b5, celui du troisième degré est majeur, ceux du quatrième et du cinquième degré sont mineurs et ceux du sixième et du septième degré sont majeurs.

Progression d’accords #1 : i-III-VI-VII

La première progression d’accords que nous allons apprendre est la « i-III-VI-VII ». Dans la tonalité de La mineur naturel, les accords de cette progression sont Am-C-F-G (La mineur, Do, Fa et Sol).

Il est important de bien comprendre chaque accord ainsi que ses renversements afin de maîtriser toutes les possibilités de la progression.

Transposition

Lorsqu’on travaille avec des chiffres romains, comme nous le faisons en nommant la progression « i-III-VI-VII », il est bénéfique de s’entraîner à transposer les progressions dans toutes les tonalités. 
Transposons notre progression en mineur. Dans la gamme de mineur naturel, il y a un sib à l’armure. 

L’accord au premier degré de la gamme de mineur est Dm (mineur), celui au troisième degré est F (Fa), celui au sixième degré est Bb (Sib) et celui au septième degré est C (Do). Donc, la progression « i-III-VI-VII » dans la tonalité de mineur est composée des accords Dm-F-Bb-C.

Progression d’accords #2 : i-VII-VI

La deuxième progression d’accords que nous allons découvrir est la « i-VII-VI ». Dans la tonalité de La mineur naturel, les accords de cette progression sont Am-G-F (La mineur, Sol majeur et Fa majeur).
Tout comme la première progression, celle-ci est à pratiquer dans tous les renversements ainsi que dans toutes les tonalités.

Progressions d’accords #3 : i-VI-V-VII

La troisième progression que nous allons apprendre est la « i-VI-V-VII ». Dans la tonalité de La mineur naturel, les accords de cette progression sont Am-F-Em-G (La mineur, Fa, Mi mineur et Sol).

N’oubliez pas de pratiquer ces progressions dans tous les renversements ainsi que dans toutes les tonalités. La transposition des différentes progressions d’accords est un excellent moyen d’apprendre les accords majeurs et mineurs de façon motivante et concrète.

Transcription par Andréane Boucher

Share this:


Return to Blog

Founder of Online Rock Lessons, Marine is the keyboardist for Uncle Kracker, Corey Hart and Highway Hunters.
With over 20 years of experience in show business, Marine is launching the first Canadian Music School dedicated to rock and blues lovers. 


START LEARNING

More Lessons

GET YOUR FREE ACCESS TO THE CHORDS COURSE

Start learning chords on the piano!


Get the Free Course

4 Triad Chords at the Piano That You MUST Know

4 TRIAD CHORDS AT THE PIANO YOU MUST KNOW

MARINE LACOSTE / CHORDING / MAY 20, 2022

 

In this lesson, we will be breaking down the 4 different types of triads.
A triad is a chord that contains three notes. A chord can have a varied number of notes, but a triad always has three notes.

The 4 Types of Triads

The notes of the chords are based on the seven degrees of the major scale.

Type #1: Major Triads 

A major triad is composed of the degrees I, III and V of the major scale.

Examples:
In the C major scale, the notes of the first, third and fifth degrees are C, E and G. Therefore, the C major chord is composed of C, E and G.

In the G major scale, the notes of the first, third and fifth degrees are G, B and D. Therefore, the G major chord is composed of G, B and D.

In the F major scale, the notes of the first, third and fifth degrees are F, A and C. Therefore, the F major chord is composed of F, A and C.

Type #2: Minor Triads

A minor chord is composed of the degrees I, bIII and V of the major scale. The difference between a major and minor triad is the third degree. In a major triad, the third degree is major whereas in a minor triad, the third degree is minor. To find the notes of a minor chord, you simply have to remember the notes of the major chord, then flatten the third note by going down a half-step.

Examples:

The first step in finding the notes of a minor chord is to remember the notes of its major chord. The notes of the C major chord are C, E and G. To transform the C major chord into a C minor chord, you have to flatten the third degree, E becomes Eb. The C minor chord is composed of C, Eb and G.

To find the notes of the G minor chord, we have to remember the notes of the G major chord, G, B and D. To transform the G major chord into a G minor chord, you have to flatten the third degree, B becomes Bb. The G minor chord is composed of G, Bb and D.

To find the notes of the F minor chord, we have to remember the notes of the F major chord, F, A and C. To transform the F major chord into a F minor chord, you have to flatten the third degree, A becomes Ab. The F minor chord is composed of F, Ab and C.

Type #3: Minor b5 Triads

A minor flat 5 chord is composed of the degrees I, bIII and bV. Similarly to the minor chord, the third degree is flattened. The difference between the minor triad and minor b5 triad is the fifth degree. In the minor triad, the fifth degree is major whereas in the minor b5 triad, the fifth degree is flattened. 

Examples:
The first step in finding the notes of the C minor b5 chord is to remember the notes of the C major chord, C, E and G. Secondly, we flatten the third degree of the chord which transforms it into a minor chord, E becomes Eb. The final step to make a chord minor b5 is to flatten the fifth degree, G becomes Gb. The C minor b5 chord is composed of C, Eb and Gb.

To find the notes of the G minor b5 chord, you need to remember the notes of the G major chord, G, B and D. We start by flattening the third degree, which transforms the major chord into a minor chord, B becomes Bb. Then we flatten the fifth degree to make the chord minor b5, D becomes Db. The G minor b5 chord is composed of G, Bb and Db.

To find the notes of the F minor b5 chord, you need to remember the notes of the F major chord, F, A and C. We start by flattening the third degree, which transforms the major chord into a minor chord, A becomes Ab. Then we flatten the fifth degree to make the chord minor b5, C becomes Cb. The F minor b5 chord is composed of F, Ab and Cb.

Type #4: Augmented Triads 

The augmented triad is a major chord that has a sharpened fifth degree. It is composed of the degrees I, III and #V. 

Examples:
To find the notes of the C augmented chord, you simply have to remember the notes of the C major chord C, E and G. Then, sharpen the fifth degree, G becomes G#. The C augmented chord is composed of C, E and G#.

To find the notes of the G augmented chord, you have to remember the notes of the G major chord, G, B and D. Then, sharpen the fifth degree, D becomes D#. The G augmented chord is composed of G, B and D#.

To find the notes of the F augmented chord, you have to remember the notes of the F major chord, F, A and C. Then, sharpen the fifth degree, C becomes C#. The F augmented chord is composed of F, A and C#.

Conclusion

Make sure to practice the 4 types of triads in all keys and inversions to master all the possible options!

Text Transcription by Andreane Boucher

Dans la leçon d’aujourd’hui, nous allons découvrir les quatre types de triades.
Commençons par démystifier les triades. Comme son préfixe « tri » l’indique, une triade est un accord à trois sons. Il existe des accords à quatre, cinq et même à six sons, mais une triade ne possède toujours que trois sons.

Les 4 types de triades

Les notes des accords sont basés sur les degrés de la gamme majeure.

Type #1 : Les triades majeures

Les triades majeures sont composées des degrés I, III et V d’une gamme majeure.

Exemples :
Dans la gamme de Do majeur, les notes aux 1er, 3e et 5e degrés sont do, mi et sol. Les notes de l’accord de Do majeur sont donc do, mi et sol.

Dans la gamme de Sol majeur, les notes aux 1er, 3e et 5e degrés sont sol, si et , les notes de la triade de Sol majeur sont donc sol, si et ré.

Dans la gamme de Fa majeur, les notes aux 1er, 3e et 5e degrés sont fa, la, do, les notes de la triade de Fa majeur sont donc fa, la et do.

Type #2 : Les triades mineures

Un accord mineur est composé des degrés I, bIII et V. La différence entre les triades majeures et mineures est le 3e degré, qui dans les triades majeures est majeur et dans les triades mineures est mineur. Pour trouver les notes d’une triade mineure, nous n’avons qu’à abaisser d’un demi-ton la note au 3e degré par rapport à celle de l’accord majeur.

Exemples :
Prenons l’accord de Do majeur et transformons-le en mineur. Les notes de la triade de Do majeur sont do, mi et sol. Pour transformer l’accord majeur en accord mineur, nous devons abaisser le 3e degré d’un demi-ton, le mi devient un mib. La triade de Do mineur est donc composée de do, mib et sol

Les notes de la triade de Sol majeur sont sol, si et . Pour transformer l’accord majeur en accord mineur, nous devons abaisser le 3e degré d’un demi-ton, le si devient un sib. La triade de Sol mineur est donc composée de sol, sib et ré.

Les notes de la triade de Fa majeur sont fa, la et do. Pour transformer l’accord majeur en accord mineur, nous devons abaisser le 3e degré d’un demi-ton, le la devient un lab. La triade de Fa mineur est donc composée de fa, lab et do.

Type #3 : Les triades mineures b5

Un accord mineur bémol 5 est composé des degrés I, bIII et bV. Tout comme les triades mineures, le 3e degré est mineur. La différence entre une triade mineure et une triade mineure bémol 5 est le 5e degré qui est bémolisé dans l’accord bémol 5.

Exemples :
Prenons l’accord de Do majeur qui est composé de do, mi et sol. Pour le rendre mineur, nous bémolisons le 3e degré, mi devient mib. Maintenant pour le rendre mineur bémol 5, nous bémolisons également le 5e degré, sol devient solb. Les notes de l’accord de Do mineur bémol 5 sont donc do, mib et solb.

Pour trouver l’accord de Sol mineur b5, nous débutons avec les notes de la triade de Sol majeur, sol, si et ré. Puis nous transformons l’accord majeur en accord mineur en abaissant le 3e degré d’un demi-ton, si devient sib. Puis nous transformons l’accord mineur en accord mineur bémol 5 en abaissant le 5e degré d’un demi-ton, devient réb. Les notes de la triade de Sol mineur bémol 5 sont sol, sib et réb.

Pour trouver l’accord de Fa mineur b5, nous débutons avec les notes de la triade de Fa majeur, fa, la et do. Puis nous transformons l’accord majeur en accord mineur en abaissant le 3e degré d’un demi-ton, la devient lab. Puis nous transformons l’accord mineur en accord mineur bémol 5 en abaissant le 5e degré d’un demi-ton, do devient dob. Les notes de la triade de Fa mineur bémol 5 sont fa, lab et dob.

Type #4 : Les triades augmentées

La triade augmentée est un accord majeur avec le 5e degré augmenté. Un accord augmenté est composé des degrés I, III et #V. 

Exemples :
Pour trouver l’accord de Do augmenté, nous débutons avec les notes de l’accord de Do majeur soit, do, mi et sol. Puis, nous augmentons d’un demi-ton le 5e degré, sol devient sol#. Les notes de la triade de Do augmenté sont do, mi et sol#.

Pour trouver l’accord de Sol augmenté, nous débutons avec les notes de l’accord de Sol majeur soit, sol, si et ré. Puis, nous augmentons d’un demi-ton le 5e degré, devient ré#. Les notes de la triade de Sol augmenté sont sol, si et ré#.

Pour trouver l’accord de Fa augmenté, nous débutons avec les notes de l’accord de Fa majeur soit, fa, la et do. Puis, nous augmentons d’un demi-ton le 5e degré, do devient do#. Les notes de la triade de Fa augmenté sont fa, la et do#.

Conclusion 

Pratiquer les quatre types de triades dans toutes les tonalités ainsi que dans tous les renversements est une bonne façon de maîtriser ces nouvelles notions!

Transcription par Andreane Boucher

Share this:


Return to Blog

Founder of Online Rock Lessons, Marine is the keyboardist for Uncle Kracker, Corey Hart and Highway Hunters.
With over 20 years of experience in show business, Marine is launching the first Canadian Music School dedicated to rock and blues lovers. 


START LEARNING

More Lessons

GET YOUR FREE ACCESS TO THE CHORDS MINI COURSE

Start learning chords on the piano!


Get the Free Mini Course

Minor Scales for Beginner

THE MINOR SCALES FOR BEGINNERS

MARINE LACOSTE / THEORY / MAY 6, 2022

 


You have probably already heard about major and minor chords before, these are actually based on the major and minor scales. In today’s video, we are going to be breaking down the three different types of minor scales.

The Relative Minor Scale

Minor scales are based on major scales. Every major scale has its own relative minor scale.

The relative minor is the 6th degree of the major scale. In order to find the relative minor of a major scale, you simply have to count up to the 6th note of the scale. For example, the relative minor of the C major scale is A minor.

The 3 Types of Minor Scales

Type #1: Natural Minor Scale

The natural minor scale has the same alterations as its relative major. The difference between the two is the starting note. Let’s take the C major scale and the A natural minor as an example; the A natural minor scale begins with A and has the same alterations as the C major scale (none) since it is its relative minor.

Type #2: Harmonic Minor Scale

This scale is very often used in classical piano training. The harmonic minor scale has the same notes as the natural minor scale with the exception of the seventh note. In the harmonic minor scale, the seventh note becomes major, meaning that it goes up a half step. In the A harmonic minor scale, G (the seventh note) becomes G#.

Type #3: Melodic Minor Scale

Similarly to the harmonic minor scale, the seventh degree of the melodic minor scale is major. The difference between the two is that the sixth degree becomes major in the melodic minor scale. In the A minor melodic scale, the F (sixth note) becomes F#.

The Two Different Types of Melodic Minor Scales:

There are two different types of melodic minor scales: the popular-jazz version and the classic version.

Popular-jazz version: 
In this version, you simply go up and down the scale with the sixth and seventh degrees major.

Classic version: 
In this version, you go up the scale with the sixth and seventh degrees major, but go down the scale with the sixth and seventh degrees minor. In other words, you go up the scale the melodic minor way and go down the scale the natural minor way.

Examples

Below are two examples to properly understand the various kinds of minor chords.

Example #1: G major

Relative minor:
This scale has one alteration (F#). The sixth note is E, therefore the relative minor of G major is E minor.

Natural minor:
In order to figure out the E natural minor scale, you have to keep in mind the alterations of the G major scales (F#) and then apply them starting from E.

Harmonic minor:
In order to figure out the E harmonic minor scale, you keep the same notes and alterations as the E natural minor, then make the seventh note major by going up a half step, D becomes D#.

Melodic minor:
In order to figure out the E melodic minor scale, you keep the same notes and alterations as the E harmonic minor scale, then make the sixth note major, C becomes C#. 

Example #2: F major

Relative minor:
This scale has one alteration (Bb). The sixth note is D, therefore the relative minor of F major is D minor.

Natural minor:
In order to figure out the D natural minor scale, you have to keep in mind the alterations of the F major scales (Bb) and then apply them starting from D.

Harmonic minor:
In order to figure out the D harmonic minor scale, you keep the same notes and alterations as the D natural minor, then make the seventh note major by going up a half step, C becomes C#.

Melodic minor:
In order to figure out the D melodic minor scale, you keep the same notes and alterations as the D harmonic minor scale, then make the sixth note major, Bb becomes B natural.

The two types of melodic minor:
The popular-jazz version goes up and down the scale the same way. The classic version goes up the scale the melodic minor way and down the natural minor way.

Conclusion
Make sure to practice these minor scales with both hands and in all keys. Understanding how the minor scales work is just as important as practicing playing them!

Text Transcription by Andreane Boucher

On entend souvent parler des accords mineurs et majeurs, ceux-ci sont tous basés sur les gammes majeures et mineures. Dans la leçon d’aujourd’hui, on va parler des trois types de gammes mineures.

La gamme relative mineure

Les gammes mineures sont basées sur les gammes majeures. Chaque gamme majeure a obligatoirement une relative mineure.

 La relative mineure d’une gamme est le sixième degré de celle-ci. Afin de trouver la relative mineure de n’importe quelle gamme majeure, il suffit de compter jusqu’à la sixième note de la gamme en question. Par exemple, la relative mineure de la gamme de do est la.

Les 3 types de gammes mineures

Type #1 : Mineure naturelle

Le premier type de gamme mineure est la gamme mineure naturelle. Celle-ci a les mêmes notes et altérations que sa relative majeure, mais débute sur une note différente. Reprenons l’exemple de do majeur et la mineur, la gamme de la mineure naturelle commence sur un la et comporte les mêmes altérations que la gamme de do majeure, donc elle n’a pas d’altération.

Type #2 : Mineure harmonique

Le deuxième type de gamme mineure est la gamme mineure harmonique. Celle-ci est une gamme très utilisée dans la technique de piano classique. La différence entre la gamme mineure naturelle et la gamme mineure harmonique est que la septième note devient majeure dans la gamme mineure harmonique. La septième note monte donc d’un demi-ton. Dans la gamme de la mineure harmonique, le sol devient un sol#.

Type #3 : Mineure mélodique

Le troisième type de gamme mineure est la gamme mineure mélodique. Tout comme dans la gamme mineure harmonique, le septième degré est majeur dans la gamme mineure mélodique. La nouveauté dans cette gamme est que le sixième degré devient majeur dans la gamme mineure mélodique. La sixième note monte donc d’un demi-ton. Dans la gamme de la mineure harmonique, le fa devient fa#.

Les 2 types de gammes mineures mélodiques :

Il existe deux types de gammes mineures mélodiques : la version populaire jazz ainsi que la version classique.

Mélodique populaire jazz :
Celle-ci consiste à monter et descendre avec les sixième et septième degrés majeurs.

Mélodique classique :
Celle-ci consiste à monter avec les sixième et septième degrés majeurs, mais à redescendre avec les sixième et septième degrés mineurs. Autrement dit, elle monte en gamme mineure mélodique et descend en gamme mineure naturelle.

Exemples

Voici deux exemples afin de bien comprendre les gammes mineures.

Exemple #1 : Sol majeur

Relative mineure:
Cette gamme a un seul dièse (fa#). La sixième note de la gamme est mi, donc, la relative mineure de sol majeur est mi mineur.

Mineure naturelle:
Pour trouver la gamme de mi mineure naturelle, il faut garder en tête les altérations de la gamme de sol majeure (fa#) et appliquer celles-ci à partir de mi.

Mineure harmonique:
Pour trouver la gamme de mi mineure harmonique, on garde les mêmes notes que la gamme mineure naturelle, mais on rend la septième note majeure, donc le devient un ré#.

Mineure mélodique:
Pour trouver la gamme de mi mineure mélodique, on garde les mêmes notes que la gamme mineure harmonique, mais on rend la sixième note majeure, donc le do devient un do#.

Les variantes de la gamme mineure mélodique :
La gamme mineure mélodique populaire jazz monte et descend de la même façon alors que la version classique monte comme une gamme mineure mélodique et descend comme une gamme mineure naturelle, donc les sixième et septième notes deviennent mineures lors de la descente.

Exemple #2: Fa majeur

Relative mineure:
Cette gamme a un seul bémol (sib). La sixième note de la gamme est , donc, la relative mineure de fa majeur est mineur.

Mineure naturelle: 
Pour trouver la gamme de mineure naturelle, il faut garder en tête les altérations de la gamme de fa majeure (sib) et appliquer celles-ci à partir de .

Mineure harmonique:
Pour trouver la gamme de mineure harmonique, on garde les mêmes notes que la gamme mineure naturelle, mais on rend la septième note majeure, donc le do devient un do#.

Mineure mélodique:
Pour trouver la gamme de mineure mélodique, on garde les mêmes notes que la gamme mineure harmonique, mais on rend la sixième note majeure, donc le si bémol devient un si bécarre.

Les variantes de la gamme mineure mélodique :
La gamme mineure mélodique populaire jazz monte et descend de la même façon alors que la version classique monte comme une gamme mineure mélodique et descend comme une gamme mineure naturelle, donc les sixième et septième notes deviennent mineures lors de la descente.

Conclusion
Il est important de non seulement apprendre à jouer les trois types de gammes mineures, et ce avec les deux mains, mais aussi de bien comprendre celles-ci. Partir d’une gamme majeure et trouver ses gammes mineures comme nous l’avons fait plutôt est un excellent moyen pour s’exercer.

Transcription par Andréane Boucher

Share this:


Return to Blog

Founder of Online Rock Lessons, Marine is the keyboardist for Uncle Kracker, Corey Hart and Highway Hunters.
With over 20 years of experience in show business, Marine is launching the first Canadian Music School dedicated to rock and blues lovers. 


START LEARNING

More Lessons

GET YOUR FREE ACCESS TO THE CHORDS COURSE

Start learning chords on the piano!


Get the Free Chords Course

The C Major Scale for Beginners

THE C MAJOR SCALE
FOR BEGINNERS

MARINE LACOSTE / TECHNIQUE / April 15, 2022

 

The major scales are the foundation of music. Every song, chord, solo and melody are based on a scale. Learning them is a big part of the piano learning process and is a must to practice.
Practicing regularly your scale will teach you a better understanding of music theory and will improve your piano technique.
In this video, I’ll teach you the first major scale every student need to learn: the C major scale. 

See you in the course!

Marine

Les gammes majeures sont la base de la musique.
Toutes les chansons, accords, solos et mélodies sont basés sur une gamme. Apprendre à les jouer fait partie du processus d’apprentissage et est définitivement un incontournable au piano.
Pratiquer régulièrement les gammes va t’enseigner une meilleure compréhension de la théorie musicale et va améliorer grandement ta technique. 

Dans ce vidéo, je t’enseigne la première gamme majeure que tous les pianistes débutants doivent connaître: La gamme de do majeur. 

On se retrouve dans le cours!

Marine

Share this:


Return to Blog

Founder of Online Rock Lessons, Marine is the keyboardist for Uncle Kracker, Corey Hart and Highway Hunters.
With over 20 years of experience in show business, Marine is launching the first Canadian Music School dedicated to rock and blues lovers. 


START LEARNING

More Lessons

GET YOUR FREE ACCESS TO THE CHORDS MINI COURSE

Start learning chords on the piano!


Get the Free Mini Course

The Best Way to Practice Your Piano Technique

THE BEST WAY TO PRACTICE PIANO TECHNIQUE

MARINE LACOSTE / TECHNIQUE / April 15, 2022

 

Technique doesn’t have to be boring! You can even play with some rockin’ backing track! 

In this video, I’ll teach you an awesome exercice from my book pour améliorer ton indépendance des mains au piano. 

Amuse-toi et on se voit dans la leçon! 

Marine


Get the Free Downloads

Share this:


Return to Blog

Founder of Online Rock Lessons, Marine is the keyboardist for Uncle Kracker, Corey Hart and Highway Hunters.
With over 20 years of experience in show business, Marine is launching the first Canadian Music School dedicated to rock and blues lovers. 


START LEARNING

More Lessons

GET YOUR FREE ACCESS TO THE CHORDS MINI COURSE

Start learning chords on the piano!


Get the Free Mini Course